Chicago Mayoral Election 2023

The latest news and information on the Chicago mayoral election and the April 4 runoff between Brandon Johnson and Paul Vallas.

A decade after leaving the classroom to help the Chicago Teachers Union build political power and improve conditions outside schools, Brandon Johnson has been sworn in as the city’s 57th mayor.
As Chicago’s next deputy mayor of education, Jen Johnson will oversee policy related to the city’s public schools, youth, and families. Historically, the deputy mayor of education also represents the mayor in contract talks with the teachers union.
The election of a teachers union organizer over a former district chief in Chicago is a win for local progressives. It could also be a bellwether for public education policy in the historically Democratic city and beyond.
Chalkbeat Chicago sat down with Mayor-elect Brandon Johnson for a brief interview. He talked about being the last mayor with control of Chicago Public Schools, what he told his kids about his new job, and what it means to be a public school parent.
Johnson won with 51.4% of the vote, according to preliminary election results. He will be the last mayor with control of Chicago Public Schools.
Brandon Johnson’s biggest donors are teachers unions. Paul Vallas is raking in cash from wealthy individuals — some of whom have supported charter schools and other education reform efforts in Chicago.
Early childhood education advocates want the winner of the April 4 runoff to prioritize access to affordable child care, attracting and retaining early childhood education staff.
A new mayor will face a school system with declining enrollment, a fiscal cliff, another round of labor negotiations, and the transition to an elected school board.
Chalkbeat breaks down Paul Vallas’ and Brandon Johnson’s positions on education issues.
Paul Vallas and Brandon Johnson disagree about how to give under-enrolled campuses a boost
Supporters of the former Chicago schools chief Paul Vallas interrupted a press conference held by Brandon Johnson backers aimed at denouncing Vallas’ schools record ahead of the heated mayoral runoff election.
As the Chicago Teachers Union found its political footing, Johnson worked on the union’s front line. Now, his years of knocking on doors might be his secret weapon to win over voters.
The top two candidates to be Chicago’s next mayor are headed to a runoff election. Both have deep experience in public education, but differ on many key challenges facing the school district. Here’s how they answered a Chalkbeat questionnaire.
With nearly all precincts reporting, former Chicago schools CEO Paul Vallas and teachers union organizer Brandon Johnson are headed to a runoff to be Chicago’s next mayor on April 4.
Candidates have taken aim at Vallas, arguing he helped create Chicago schools’ current financial problems and laid the groundwork that led to the eventual closing of Black and Latino schools.
Lightfoot struggled with labor relations and pandemic school closures, changed her views on an elected school board, and plowed more city money into school building repairs during her first term.
The Cook Commissioner and Teachers Union organizer’s education platform includes tackling the district’s school funding model and providing free public transit rides and universal child care.
Vallas’s education platform brings back some policies from his time as CEO of Chicago Public Schools. His platform proposes to expand charters, alternative schools, and work study programs. Vallas also wants to keep schools open on nights, weekends, holidays, and during summer to provide young people a safe place to go.
After collecting dozens of questions from readers, Chalkbeat Chicago sent 10 to the candidates running for mayor. Here’s a look at where they stand on the top issues facing Chicago Public Schools.
The Board of Ethics has previously warned elected officials and campaigns to scrub their listserv of any government emails.
Mayor says outreach to to educators at Chicago Public Schools and City Colleges was an “honest mistake” by a staffer.
The move may violate city and district ethics rules surrounding political activity and official business.
The candidates have varying connections to the city’s schools and young people. Chalkbeat Chicago is summing up what they’ve done and is asking readers what questions we should ask them.
Before heading to Congress in 2019, U.S. Rep. Jesus “Chuy” Garcia forced former Mayor Rahm Emanuel into a runoff in 2015 with the backing of the Chicago Teachers Union.
Former teacher Brandon Johnson is one of at least eight people challenging Mayor Lori Lightfoot.
State Rep. Kambium “Kam” Buckner outlined a platform for Chicago Public Schools that looks to tackle the district’s school funding model, staffing, and universal preschool for all 3-year-olds.
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